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We specialize in “hand -done drawings” (never computer done) for

your advertisement ,editorial and design purposes.

Be it your new fashion brands  collateral ,your record labels logo or new restaurant’s Decorative mural

Orin’s unique style will add nuance to your Hi-end Brands campaign.

alleshoes gcshoeheavenfragile-adgirls_allure visionorins-summer-girl

primitive-by-orinnyc-duo

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pick your own trainers website page illustrations by Orin ink

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Watch subway artist draw incredible caricatures of fellow passengers on moving train

As someone films him with a mobile phone, Rodrick A. Perry – who goes by the nickname Orin – expertly produces brilliant likenesses of people around him

Faster Than a Speeding Train: Artist Man

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  • When Rodrick A. Perry rides New York’s subways, his friendly face masks Polaroid eyes that can capture a rider in the time it takes to travel between two stations.

In that same time span, Mr. Perry, who has adopted the name Orin, will rough out a sketch of that rider, hand it to his subject and move on to draw someone else. His work is at once a solicitation and an act of altruism: a note at the bottom of the drawing suggests that tips are welcome but that in any case, the sketch is the rider’s to keep.

Soliciting tips for services may fly in the face of the Rules Governing the Conduct and Safety of the Public on the city’s subways and buses, Part 1050.6, to be specific. But so, it often seems, does smiling at and talking to strangers on the subway, which often happens among riders watching Mr. Perry work. They usually start out smiling at each other’s sketches, work up the nerve to comment on each other’s features and then share laments that they gave up their own tendencies to draw years ago.

On average, Mr. Perry said, he uses a pack of 500 sheets of laser-printer paper in a week. He said that about half the people whom he sketches reward him with a tip, usually $1 or $2. ”I set how much I want to make for the day,” he said, generally $50. He rarely collects that much, but as long as he brings in enough to pay his share of the rent, he says, he is satisfied.

His day on the subway can last two to four hours but he will work considerably longer if he is motivated by a particular theme. ”Some days I’ll just draw large women,” he said. ”Some days I’ll just draw kids. Most days I draw everyone.”

”I’ve been doing this full time for about a year, but I was always doing this between jobs,” he said. ”For 20 years I lived differently. I was a nine-to-fiver. I worked sales, I worked all these kinds of jobs and I would get up early in the morning, go to work and do what everyone else was doing.”

His former life, Mr. Perry said, has allowed him to ”totally understand when people are not receptive to what I’m doing.”

”This person’s had either a hard day; they don’t want to be bothered,” he said. ”It’s their option; it’s their privacy.”

He favors the R and the N trains in Manhattan, and in Queens, because he likes the view of Long Island City from the elevated track. He used to ride the E line, which runs from Queens to the World Trade Center, but has not returned since September 2001.

The R train is also one of Mr. Perry’s favorites because the cars have colored, individually molded seats rather than lines of bench seating. ”The way things are lined up in the R, people can be in their own space, be doing their thing and not so superconscious of you looking straight at them,” he said.

The setup also makes his stealth approach easier. While even the hint of objection from his subject will send him moving, he can often finish a sketch before his model is even aware of his presence, leaving the person to decide how to respond to his or her new likeness as Mr. Perry searches for another face. ”I try to be discreet about it, but I also have an aim,” he said. ”I try not to make it too much of a hustle for them. Like I try not to set a price for them because I think to myself: ‘People should have a right to decide. They don’t need art; it’s not like bread.”’

Sometimes, Mr. Perry is unable to finish a sketch before his subject gets up and walks away. When that happens, he flips the unfinished drawing down to the bottom of his stack of paper and moves on. He keeps all the partial works, as well as those drawings that are left behind. ”I’ll file them away,” he said, ”thinking to myself that if I’m ever doing commercial work, I would use these faces to make the illustrations a bit more realistic.”

Mr. Perry has been sketching riders for so long that some recognize him, and either move away or signal that they would like a paper portrait.

On an uptown R train in Manhattan one recent afternoon, a young girl giggled and blushed a bright red as she watched Mr. Perry sketch another rider. Then she moved into a seat across from him, cajoled her severe, matronly companion into sitting beside her, and asked Mr. Perry to sketch them. After asking where they were getting off, he took what is for him an unusual amount of time– five stops, from Herald Square to Lexington Avenue and 59th Street. Clearly pleased, they handed him a few folded dollar bills as they got off the train. Mr. Perry got off too, then boarded a downtown R train and continued sketching.

”During the day, I stay in Manhattan,” he said. ”Not because I feel it’s better money, but I feel, sometimes, people’s attitudes change when they’re in Manhattan. We have the assumption that Manhattan is a special city where the kind of thing that I do is allowed.”

Reza A. Ebrahimi, 12, was visiting Manhattan from Long Island for a day of fun when he, his mother and two siblings encountered Mr. Perry on an R train. Reza was paying no attention as Mr. Perry began wielding a marker that looks like charcoal but is not as messy. Reza’s older sister clued him in, but the boy did not acknowledge what was going on until the artist presented him with his likeness. ”I just thought it was his job and I didn’t want to be rude, so I just let him finish,” Reza said. ”It came out good so I’m going to put it up in my room and show it off to people.”

His mother, Liliana I. Ebrahimi, 42, who calls New York ”a place to come and enjoy,” was not at all perturbed by a stranger’s attention to her son. ”In the city, nobody has privacy,” she said matter-of-factly.

Photos: Rodrick A. Perry quickly sketches subway riders, like Daisy Rodriguez, who became an art subject aboard an R train in Manhattan last week. (Photographs by Nancy Siesel/The New York Times)

Was on my way home from a show tonight, when this guy starts drawing this lady on the subway.  After he gave her the drawing, he asked if another gentleman wanted his portrait drawn.  The portrait was completed in minutes.  After a few more people, I had the opportunity to have my portrait drawn.  Orin Ink or Roderick ‘Orin’ Perry, has been doing these portraits with black marker on white paper for some time and has even been featured in the Village Voice.

This was a really cool experience, and people just got really curious…and happy.  He only asks for donations so he can buy the drawing supplies, but if you can’t donate, he doesn’t fuss about it.

Check out the 90 second video of him tonight at work and if you have the chance, check out his blog.  Maybe if you see him on the train, he’ll draw you!

New York Minute

My neighbor and I boarded the downtown A Train at rush hour one morning last week where I noticed a man drawing a portrait in a seat close to us. He was using bold strokes and working quickly.

The artist was a Black man, around forty years old by my guess, and he wore close-cropped facial hair and an army-green cap. His two front teeth appeared to be wrestling and the right tooth was winning.

My neighbor and I chatted for several stops and I didn’t give the artist another thought until I turned my head and saw that five or six people in our vicinity were holding portraits of themselves. The artist was reaching across the aisle to hand a fresh drawing to a stout, middle-aged Korean man who had his eyes closed.

The Korean man rejected the drawing without looking at it. Generally, this isn’t an insulting move. If you took every piece of paper that was handed to you in this city, you’d drown in the stuff. The artist explained, albeit with an edge, that he was handing him a drawing. The Korean man relented, though I still don’t think he understood what was going on.

And the Korean man’s instincts were at least partially on target. The artist was seeking tips. It was a clever, much more palatable (to me anyway) method of asking for cash on the subway, but it still put the recipient of the portrait on the spot. Some people gave the artist money for the drawing, some didn’t.

I leaned over to see the picture of the Korean man. It was a very good-not-great likeness, but when I considered that it was probably the seventh drawing the artist had done in less than thirty minutes, I bumped up the grade. He saw me looking and asked if I wanted a picture too.

I wanted to say yes, but we were slowing down to arrive at my stop, so I told him that there wasn’t time. He went to work on someone else. Then the train stopped and we waited for ten minutes poised right outside the 59th st stop.  He finished three more drawings in the ten-minute delay.

He didn’t come back to me, but he did catch my neighbor. Check it out.


Orin Ink Client List /A word of thanks to the Universe and to the very kind people in it who have supported my work over the last 12 years and even beyond_ORIN

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I am an artist with a very clear vision of how art can inspire and of the spiritual as well as material power Art embodies. I began the Subway Series to gain direct contact, build audience and further my work.In my eyes it has been a very succesfull journey .It has been an informative and very creative 12 years.some of the personal  challenges have been letting go of expectations…letting go of my ego ..putting myself in the process and not expecting rewards letting the work itself be the reward all lessons i have been able to use in my commercial pursuits as well. Then at times accepting criticism…constructive… as well as opinions from just outright plain jealousy or “mean”spiritedness and the subtle art of learning to tell the difference ..learning to disengage from the need for praise or being destroyed by the opposite .These are great life lessons and the subway series has allowed for this .I have learned to see art through the eyes of the working class(the bulk of who make up my audience)…there interests ..sometimes total lack of it as well as there own creative ambitions and abilities  and Artist who have been the most supportive and i thank you all.-OI

Betty Newman/Benew&The Holding Corporation

Sky mgmt(realtors)

PYOT(pick your own trainers)

F4architectures/

Beaumarchaise /Bagatelle-

Primitive Design

American Airlines/Red Rooster/Black Atlas

Black Swan gastro-pub/Assembled Spaces

Broadway Cares Fight AIDs

Ian Velardi/Hickey Freeman /GQ

Brooklyn Psychological Services

Allure Vision llc

Brown Betty Restaurent

Ginger ‘n Cream /Princess Ciel ltd

Latino Print /stock art

Fragile Boutique /Loisada

Stats Haberdashery/nyc

Sheila Buchanon* Reynald Perry and Reynal Perry Jr*Carolyn Coleman*Melissa Molinar*Melanie Harris *Patrick Clinton*Eric Willams* Guilleme Castalbajac*Benjamine Parant* Lois Samuels *Mona Klien Livingston*Wong Dowling*Jean De Boysson*Clare and Carlos Tejada*Sue Bahn*John Pasmore*Russel Miller*Daniel Shumate *Cynthia Walker*Wayne Sterling*Jayson Keeling*Genyar Ejiofer*Ml Kinnel*Edward Mohamed*James Holmes*Sacha Harford*Rommel Wilson*Gianni Teal and Lois Teal and so many more .. thank you for believing in me,I believe in you  __Orin

Art work for PYOT-pick your own trainer webpage -2012

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you get fit and stay fit. Obtain exercise tips, expert advice, online tracker tools, and much more. Sort through our
community of personal trainers and locate the trainer that’s perfect for you.

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Step 2:  Type in your Zip code into the Search Box

Step 3:  Find trainer that best fits your needs

Search for 1 on 1 training gyms, health clubs, sports facilities, fitness centers, public parks, wellness spas, yoga studios, specialty stores, and more.

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We the companies owners and i wanted to do something like the archies comics from back in the day something a bit generic but modern .

Orin ink -decorative mural work-client-Black Swan-Michelin Guide rated Bed Stuy Gastro-pub-/Assembled Spaces architectural firm

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Black Swan is the latest in a series of New American gastropubs in Clinton Hill/Bed Stuy. The interior tells the story of an impressive transformation from auto-body shop to sleek hall with a long copper bar, jet-black hardwood walls, and hand-worn tables; a short back porch invites the breeze inside. The kitchen’s lightly exotic starting lineup includes Caribbean chicken with mashed rum plantains, a mild but memorable turkey chili, and a set of sticky Thai wings glazed with a sauce that’s just sweet and sour enough. Further down the menu, Prince Edward Island mussels swim in a creamy lemon-butter broth while a salmon BLT includes an avocado smear and a fistful of crisp pork. – Patrick Mcmullin/NYMag

On My poor artist P.R. Trail -I draw new Yorkers everyday -good way to stay sharp with skills and let people know you are out there -here are a few young writers verbal sketches of the artist …interesting..hmm ..lol

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o

Draw the Line

Hanging out with New York’s subway portraitist

Comments (0)By Nina Lalli Tuesday, Jul 18 2006

Village Voice article:

“Isn’t it funny how people don’t like their profiles? Bumps, hooks—people hate those things,”Roderick Anthony Perry says, baffled. He loves bumpy noses and dimpled chins. “To me, that’s what makes people beautiful. Otherwise, it would be like a race of robots.” He pauses and grins. “That was the problem with fashion.”

An Orin original

photo: Nina Lalli
An Orin original

Perry, who goes by the nickname Orin, says he used to work as a freelance fashion producer for magazines like One World and Inner City. He describes the job as “glorified messenger.” For the last three years, he has supplemented his income from various projects (most recently, murals for a clothing store in New Jersey) with donations he receives for portraits he draws on the subway.

I spent a few hours with Orin on a recent Thursday, riding the R train from City Hall to 59th street and back. “I like the R,” he said while we waited on the platform. We had barely met before the bumps in my nose were being celebrated (politely) on his clipboard. “Where is your family from?” he asked. This is a game he usually plays in his head, trying to guess the ethnicity of various straphangers before he gets any clues from talking to them.

Perhaps you have been the unwitting model for one of Orin’s works. Considering his gregariousness, he has a surprising ability to disappear in a car full of weary commuters and wide-eyed tourists. Sometimes he draws the pretty young woman painting her nails and listening to headphones, but he usually goes for faces with character, or whoever is closest to him.

The sketches, done in black marker on white computer paper, take a stop or two to complete. Starting with broad strokes—the hair, the jaw line—and then filling in with small, quick lines, the face emerges, like magic. The window behind the person, or the ad, fills in the background. Suddenly, he places a drawing on the seat next to his subject, with a note reading something like “Feel free to tip if you like the picture.” The reactions he gets vary—occasionally this creeps people out, but most often, a look of wonder spreads across the face of the muse. A dollar usually appears. Sometimes five.

On this particular Thursday, Orin chose as one of his subjects a curmudgeonly looking older man (Orin guessed that he might be Russian) with thinning hair and heavy eyes. The man watched him draw, looking annoyed, but when presented with the finished work, the frown lines in his face shifted into a beaming smile. Orin wasn’t as surprised as I was, saying later that it’s often those who look the least happy who are most pleased. But the man had no cash on him, and his smile quickly turned into an expression of unbearable guilt. Orin told him not to worry about it, and moved on to his next drawing, but the man (whose accent did indeed sound Eastern European) insisted on getting the artist’s phone number so he could somehow get the money to him later.

“How much is it?” he asked. Orin tried again to explain that donations were optional, but eventually he wrote on the paper: $1,000,000,000. “I can understand that you might not have that kind of cash on you,” he said. The man erupted into laughter, and Orin joined in. This is one of the great joys of New York, one that people unfortunately avoid too much—talking to strangers.

Later, a woman got on the train with six shaggy-haired blond boys, wallet chains dangling from the pockets of their shorts. Now, Orin found himself challenged to draw each one of them in just a few stops. “Draw me! Draw him!” they pleaded. The other passengers in the car moved closer to watch. The bolder boys posed eagerly, chins up and shoulders back; the littler ones were shoved in front of the clipboard, held up by the backs of their shirts by the older ones. Before rushing off the train, they compared their drawings. “Wow—you really look like you!” they said. “Thank you, sir.”

Afterwards, Orin talked about the difficulty of getting one of the boys’ eyes right. They were big but deep-set, and he should have used more shading. He says the subway is like an art class for him. “At some point, the train became my studio.”

Faster Than a Speeding Train: Artist Man

By THOMAS W. HOLCOMB Jr/The New York Times
Published: July 06, 2006

When Rodrick A. Perry rides New York’s subways, his friendly face masks Polaroid eyes that can capture a rider in the time it takes to travel between two stations.

In that same time span, Mr. Perry, who has adopted the name Orin, will rough out a sketch of that rider, hand it to his subject and move on to draw someone else. His work is at once a solicitation and an act of altruism: a note at the bottom of the drawing suggests that tips are welcome but that in any case, the sketch is the rider’s to keep.

Soliciting tips for services may fly in the face of the Rules Governing the Conduct and Safety of the Public on the city’s subways and buses, Part 1050.6, to be specific. But so, it often seems, does smiling at and talking to strangers on the subway, which often happens among riders watching Mr. Perry work. They usually start out smiling at each other’s sketches, work up the nerve to comment on each other’s features and then share laments that they gave up their own tendencies to draw years ago.

On average, Mr. Perry said, he uses a pack of 500 sheets of laser-printer paper in a week. He said that about half the people whom he sketches reward him with a tip, usually $1 or $2. ”I set how much I want to make for the day,” he said, generally $50. He rarely collects that much, but as long as he brings in enough to pay his share of the rent, he says, he is satisfied.

His day on the subway can last two to four hours but he will work considerably longer if he is motivated by a particular theme. ”Some days I’ll just draw large women,” he said. ”Some days I’ll just draw kids. Most days I draw everyone.”

”I’ve been doing this full time for about a year, but I was always doing this between jobs,” he said. ”For 20 years I lived differently. I was a nine-to-fiver. I worked sales, I worked all these kinds of jobs and I would get up early in the morning, go to work and do what everyone else was doing.”

His former life, Mr. Perry said, has allowed him to ”totally understand when people are not receptive to what I’m doing.”

”This person’s had either a hard day; they don’t want to be bothered,” he said. ”It’s their option; it’s their privacy.”

He favors the R and the N trains in Manhattan, and in Queens, because he likes the view of Long Island City from the elevated track. He used to ride the E line, which runs from Queens to the World Trade Center, but has not returned since September 2001.

The R train is also one of Mr. Perry’s favorites because the cars have colored, individually molded seats rather than lines of bench seating. ”The way things are lined up in the R, people can be in their own space, be doing their thing and not so superconscious of you looking straight at them,” he said.

The setup also makes his stealth approach easier. While even the hint of objection from his subject will send him moving, he can often finish a sketch before his model is even aware of his presence, leaving the person to decide how to respond to his or her new likeness as Mr. Perry searches for another face. ”I try to be discreet about it, but I also have an aim,” he said. ”I try not to make it too much of a hustle for them. Like I try not to set a price for them because I think to myself: ‘People should have a right to decide. They don’t need art; it’s not like bread.”

Sometimes, Mr. Perry is unable to finish a sketch before his subject gets up and walks away. When that happens, he flips the unfinished drawing down to the bottom of his stack of paper and moves on. He keeps all the partial works, as well as those drawings that are left behind. ”I’ll file them away,” he said, ”thinking to myself that if I’m ever doing commercial work, I would use these faces to make the illustrations a bit more realistic.”

Mr. Perry has been sketching riders for so long that some recognize him, and either move away or signal that they would like a paper portrait.

On an uptown R train in Manhattan one recent afternoon, a young girl giggled and blushed a bright red as she watched Mr. Perry sketch another rider. Then she moved into a seat across from him, cajoled her severe, matronly companion into sitting beside her, and asked Mr. Perry to sketch them. After asking where they were getting off, he took what is for him an unusual amount of time– five stops, from Herald Square to Lexington Avenue and 59th Street. Clearly pleased, they handed him a few folded dollar bills as they got off the train. Mr. Perry got off too, then boarded a downtown R train and continued sketching.

 

Theo Boy -Vimeo-The dj Project -Brown Betty -Clinton Hill

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the video above was made by Theo Boy …i like its look …i am not crazy about its narrative ….i find it interesting that the director chose to present a moment of violence and aggression  instead of communication and acceptance. I am a firm believer that what you put forward and in front of people will not only reflect who you the artist are but also influence your audience .I am old school perhaps in that way .The video was a project Mr Boy asked me to participate in ….i generously gave my time but in the midst of it regretted it as i did earlier with another young director Sacha Palladino …Its not personal  both directors are formidable talents but  directors especially ones who are trying to make a mark always go for the sensational aspect of the subject …when real power is in the quiet and sometimes truly banal aspect of most anyone’s life .I  guess i  just feel no one will ever tell my story the way i can .The amazing things i see daily i will have to chronicle and not expect those who do not live my experience to tell it .Its(the piece ) romantic but it is hardly my reality after doing 300.000 drawings …meeting so many people and getting such amazing response i can hardly honestly say this reflects anything near the awesome experience of sharing ones work with people …conversations with people …the heartfelt and silly moments .what i do is entertainment and a gentle reminder that we are “in” a moment with others like a good friend always says to me “I see You ”

L’ETE

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i really love old posters and magazine illustrations from french magazines of the 30″, 40’s and even 50’s .I am going to do a series of these soon.I also love  Lois Mailou Jones and Elizabeth Catlett and Jean Cocteau and go back to there work constantly as inspiration .